Mission Report by Sarah Barry November 1956


Presbyterian Mission
Yang Nim Dong, Chulla Namdo
Kwangju, Korea
November 1, 1956

Dear Friends:
The other day, Marjorie Linton (Mrs. Dwight) and I got on our bicycles, picked a road, and headed for the outskirts of Kwangju City. We had our pockets full of tracts, and when we stopped at every hill to push the bicycles up, we found opportunities to talk to all kind of people and to give the tracts to those who promised to read them. Our road ended at one of the many orphanages in the city, so we decided to go in and “sight-see”. As we stopped outside, and the children crowded around, I was surprised to hear one speak very politely and call my name. There, wearing a bright smile, was a little girl whom I had gotten to know during the months she spent in the Graham Memorial T.B. Hospital. Although she’ll have to be careful for a long time, she looked as happy and healthy as any of the other children.
A lot of children come into the T.B. hospital from the orphanage of the city. Many have T.B. and stay for treatment and some don’t and are discharged. Tal Soo is about six years old. Although he still has active T.B., he is a walking miracle! Whe he came into the hospital, he looked like a sitting skeleton. He couldn’t walk, and he wouldn’t talk – he just stared, and occasionally beligerantly hit at people who tried to be friendly. Now, he is all over the hospital and is so friendly he’s everybody’s pet. His special favorite is Miss Astrid Kraakenes, the missionary head nurse, with whom he tags along as she makes her afternoon rounds of the hospital. He doesn’t miss a single worship service, either.
Sa Junie came into the hospital because he looked so weak and scrawny the folks at the orphanage thought he must have T.B. He couldn’t even stand alone, and because he spent his time listlessly picking at the bed covers, some of the staff thought he didn’t have a good sense. Wonder of wonders, hospital tests showed he didn’t have T.B. The main thing wrong with him was just malnutrition. He couldn’t stay in the hospital, because being exposed daily, he might really catch T.B. So he came home with me. I don’t remember a section on the application for missionary service on taking care of babies – anyway, if there were one, I’m sure I left it completely blank. Surprisingly enough however, Sa Junie is getting more healthy every day. He can walk across the room by himself, and he even laughs occasionally, right out loud, like a real three-year-old. He has been living with us a month now and when he gets a little stronger, I’m hoping to find a Christian home in which to put him. I’m sure the Lord will open the door to his future.
My main contact with the hospital has been after language study hours. Working with one of the nurses, we started some occupational therapy work with the patients who were well enough to do it. That work is going rather slowly now, because as soon as the patients are well enough to work, they are discharged to make room for someone who is sicker. So, lately, I’ve been going over just to visit the patients. Naturally, my conversation is rather limited, but there have been opportunities to sing hymns with them, tell children Bible stories, witness to non-Christians, and encourage discouraged Christians.
Needless to say, we were all thrilled to learn that one-half of the Birthday Offering of the Women of the Church is to be used for medical work in Korea. A part of that money, anyway will be used to buy drugs and to help care for children like these.
Sincerely,
   Sara Barry

Received at Nashville, Tenn., November 7, 1956
Address: Miss Sara Barry (as indicated above)
Postage: Letters sent by regular mail 8¢ per ounce, 4¢ for Postal Cards
Air mail 25¢ per each one-half ounce – Air mail folders may be purchased at the Post Office for 10¢

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